Book Review: Fall of Night by Rachel Caine

Fall of Night is the fourteenth book in the Morganville Vampires series by Rachel Caine.

Summary:

When Claire Danvers is given the opportunity to join MIT’s graduate course, it’s something that she can’t pass up.  After all, it’s been a lifelong dream of hers, and now, with the permission of Morganville’s founder, Amelie, it’s one she can actually achieve.  The only thing is, she’ll be leaving her friends, including her boyfriend Shane, behind.

When she get’s there, she is to be working with another former Morganville resident, and a former assistant to Claire’s vampire boss, Myrnin.  When Professor Irene Andersen hears about the prototype machine Claire has been working, a machine that will hopefully be able to cancel out the mental abilities of vampires, she is more than a little keen to learn more…

Everything sounds perfect…maybe too perfect.  Yet Morganville and it’s troubles never seem very far away…

Favourite Quote:

“Pish, I only lost part of my brain.  It wasn’t even the most important part.”

Review:

It was nice to get out of Morganville again to see what life in this world is like beyond the Texan town, and this really added an injection of freshness into the story.  As did the new characters that we meet while we are there.  Jesse and Pete were definitely at the top of the “new interesting characters” list.

Like the rest of the series, there is plenty of action and adventure and the story moves at a pretty fast pace.  I have read a few reviews of this book and notice that one or two people have said it would have been nice to see Claire more of a student before the usual trouble gravitates towards her.  As I read the book, it never occurred to me – perhaps because that’s not just how these things work and Claire just isn’t that lucky.  That being said, it might have been fun to read, just to see how she would cope with normal life after her time spent in Morganville.

The alternate viewpoints – between Claire and Shane – really helped in moving the story forwards as separate story threads unfolded. And as for the ending…The book ends on a major cliffhanger.

All-in-all, this is perhaps one of the best of the latter books in the series, and really rewards those who have kept on reading.  It’s a long series, but in my opinion, it’s a good one.

Rating:

Bookish Reflections – March 2017

A monthly round up of all things bookish at Sammi Loves Books…It’s my attempt at becoming more accountable in my reading and reviewing habits…


In a nutshell

I’ve read more books than I have had the time to review this month.  Also being struck down by another horrible cold has meant that I am still behind with many of my goals and that I’m still playing catch-up.  On top of that, I’ve been having computer trouble too…March has not been a particularly great month.

Books I’ve reviewed

Favourite read of the month

Fighting for Freetown by Comic Relief

Books I’ve bought

None – I’ve been so good this month…not entirely sure how I managed it…

Books I’ve downloaded

  • Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales vol. 2

Book review requests I’ve accepted

Still behind with email responses 😦

What I’ve been reading on Wattpad

February’s “What I’m reading and reviewing next month” goals

What I’m reading and reviewing next month

  • Linger by Maggie Stiefvatar (read but not reviewed)
  • The Wild Swans by Hans Christian Andersen (read but not yet reviewed)
  • Fall of Night by Rachel Caine (read but not yet reviewed)
  • Daylighters by Rachel Caine (read but not yet reviewed)
  • Inquisition by Alfredo Col   (current read)

I’m also hoping to get the two book’s from February’s list above read and reviewed.

Goodreads Reading Challenge

My goal is 57.  I have read 9.  16% complete.  Currently 5 books behind schedule.

Other reads (books not on Goodreads) : 1

Total books read so far this year: 10

 

Non-Fiction Review: Fighting for Freetown by Comic Relief

Summary:

This short non-fiction read tells the story of a young woman, Ikmatu, and how she helped her community when Ebola struck Sierra Leone in 2014.

Favourite Quote:

But Ikmatu didn’t want to just sit back and do nothing.  She wanted to fight for the home that she loved.

So that’s what she did.

Review:

This really is an inspirational read.  Ikmatu’s story is touching – I can’t imagine being thirteen years old and being witness to the spread of such a terrible disease.  This young woman’s courage and care for the people where she lived, even when they looked at her with fear and suspicion, is truly moving.

I am reminded of the review I wrote for Morality for Beautiful Girls by Alexander McCall Smith, where I mentioned ” a theme of the book is that Africa can teach the world how to care for other people”, and I think this book not only echoes that sentiment, but reinforces it.

You can read Ikmatu’s inspiring account by heading over to Wattpad.

Rating:

Book Review: Bitter Blood by Rachel Caine

Bitter Blood is book thirteen in the Morganville Vampires series by Rachel Caine.

Summary:

Things are never easy in Morganville.  Now that the only thing vampires are scared of – the draug – are no longer a threat, the delicate balance in the town where humans and vampires have just about managed to get along, is thrown into disarray.  Vampires, who had kept some of their wilder instincts in check thanks to the effort by the town’s founder, Amelie, are suddenly allowed to indulge in their every whim – no matter the cost to the human population.

But this is Morganville.  Will the living inhabitants of the town decide to cower in a corner or fight for their lives?  Once again, the inhabitants of the Glass house find themselves stuck in the middle, and their list of friends is dwindling all the time…

To complicate matters further, a group of ghost hunters are in town, filming for their latest TV show.  Surely that can only end in disaster?

Favourite Quote:

I lifted up the right slipper again and addressed its soggy little head.  ‘I’m afraid I might have

to leave you behind.  And you too, twin.  It will be difficult enough to climb without you hampering me.

And your fangs aren’t very sharp.’

Review:

It’s been months since I last visited Morganville.  I must admit that I was apprehensive as I read the first few pages, wondering if I was going to enjoy this book as much as I remembered enjoying the rest of the series.  After all, we are on book thirteen now, and I kind of felt as if I was waiting for the bottom to fall out of the series; can something this good really stay this good or will there come a time when I think that the latest book doesn’t live up to the rest?

I needn’t have feared.  It wasn’t long before I was completely immersed in the town and characters’ lives once more, wondering how Claire, Shane, Michael and Eve were going to get out of the latest mess they found themselves in.  But as always, Myrnin stole the show; my favourite quote from the book is courtesy of this rather strange, wonderful character.

Again we are given glimpses into other characters POV, which certainly adds an extra dimension to the story as well as heightening the tension as the tale unfolds. There were a good number of plot twists that I didn’t see coming, and the drama was nicely interspersed with action, ensuring the pace never falters.  Al-in-all, an entertaining, addictive read.

As I write this review, I’ve already read books fourteen and fifteen in the series, so you can expect to see those reviews posted soon.

Rating:

Short Story Review: Death in the Kitchen by Milward Kennedy

great-crime-stories-front-cover

Summary:

Rupert Morrison is fed up with being blackmailed by George Manning so sets out to put a stop to it once and for all.  The only problem is, when consumed with plotting the perfect murder, in the hope you might get away with it, there is always one thing that has been overlooked…

Favourite Quote:

He glanced round the little kitchen, deliberately looking at the figure which lay huddled on the floor; huddled but yet in an attitude which Morrison hoped was as natural as its unnatural circumstances would permit.  For the head was inside the oven of the rusty-looking gas-stove.

Review:

This is the first work by Milward Kennedy that I have read, and I really enjoyed it.  At only four pages long, this short story is a very short story.  However, it does manage to pack a lot into it and the twist at the end – which I did not see coming at all – was fantastic.

I would recommend this story to those who enjoy their crime stories set during the first half of the twentieth century, as well as to those who are learning how to write a convincing, concise crime story.

Rating:

three-stars

I found Death in the Kitchen by Milward Kennedy in Great Crime Stories by Chancellor Press.

Bookish Reflections – February 2017

A monthly round up of all things bookish at Sammi Loves Books…It’s my attempt at becoming more accountable in my reading and reviewing habits…


In a nutshell

So February was a little slow.  I had the flu for a fortnight, and for one week of that I couldn’t even pick up a book.  Then I spent the rest of the month playing catch-up, and I’m still behind.  If you’re waiting to hear back about review requests, I’m so sorry for the delay, but I hope to get back to you soon.

Books I’ve reviewed

Favourite read of the month

Shared equally between Under the Dragon’s Tail by Maureen Jennings and Morality for Beautiful Girls by Alexander McCall Smith.

Books I’ve bought

  • Linger by Maggie Stiefvatar
  • Divergent by Veronica Roth

Books I’ve downloaded

None this month.  I’ve been good.

Book review requests I’ve accepted

None this month – see “In a nutshell” above.

What I’ve been reading on Wattpad

Sadly, I’ve been neglecting Wattpad too.

What I’m reading and reviewing next month

  • Bitter Blood by Rachel Caine
  • Requiem for a Mezzo by Carola Dunn
  • The Kalahari Typing School for Men by Alexander McCall Smith

As for the rest of March’s reading material, it will all depend on how I’m feeling.

Goodreads Reading Challenge

My goal is 57.  I have read 7.  12% complete.  Currently 2 books behind schedule.

 

Book Review: Morality for Beautiful Girls by Alexander McCall Smith

morality-for-beautiful-girls-front-cover

Morality for Beautiful Girls is the third book in The No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series by Alexander McCall Smith.

Summary:

Things are all-change for Mma Ramotswe.  First, she has decided to move her detective agency into the office of her fiance’s garage, but something’s not right with Mr J.L.B. Matekoni.  As she tries to work out what is wrong with him, as well as care for the two orphans they have decided to foster, she must also find a way to ensure that both of their businesses keep ticking over.

Then an important client who works for the government sends her on a case out of Gaboronne, leaving Mma Makutsi to not only run the detective agency, but step in as Acting Manager for Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors.  While Precious Ramotswe is investigating a possible case of poisoning, Grace Makutsi must help the organiser and chief judge of the Miss Glamorous Botswana beauty competition seek out the most deserving of the finalists.  If she can do that, she will earn the detective agency a generous fee.  The problem is, she only has three days in which to do it…

Favourite Quote:

What was too big, anyway? Who was to tell another person what size they should be?

It was a form of dictatorship, by the thin, and she was not having any of it.

Review:

I thoroughly enjoyed this read, or rather, re-read, but it has been a few years since I have read from this series.  A point worth noting is that these books are always as good as I remember them and never fail to entertain.  They are nicely paced and easy to read, thanks to the writing style of the author.

It’s very easy to connect to the characters in these books, and as the characters themselves are concerned about the welfare of others, (indeed a theme of the book is that Africa can teach the world how to care for other people), when they are going through a rough patch, as a reader I feel concerned for them.  There is so much colour and vibrancy to the story, and the descriptions of Botswana, especially the descriptions of how the people feel connected to their land, is engaging and uplifting to read.

Grace Makutsi really comes into her own in this instalment, as she takes on the role of Acting Manager for Mr J.L.B. Matekoni’s Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors as well as trying to fulfil her job as assistant detective.

The next book in the series is The Kalahari Typing School for Men.  And I can’t wait to reread it, so I’ve added it to next month’s reading list.  I highly recommend this book series for those who enjoy a gentle ramble through a heartwarming cosy mystery alongside some wonderful characters.

Rating:

five-stars